beagle.jpg
photo credit http://www.amontessorimusingplace.org/2010/05/eagles-of-hornby-island.html
photo credit http://www.amontessorimusingplace.org/2010/05/eagles-of-hornby-island.html

Average life span in the wild:
Up to 28 years
Size:
Body, 34 to 43 inches; Wingspan, 6 to 8 feet
Weight:
6.5 to 14 lbs
The largest bald eagle nest on record was 9.5 ft wide and 20 ft high. It weighed more than two tons.
animals.nationalgeographic.com


Photo by Tony Northrup http://www.northrup.org/ used with permission
Photo by Tony Northrup http://www.northrup.org/ used with permission

Nesting Facts
Clutch Size
1–3 eggs
Number of Broods
1 broods
Egg Length
2.3–3.3 in 5.8–8.4 cm
Egg Width
1.9–2.5 in 4.7–6.3 cm
Incubation Period
34–36 days
Nestling Period
56–98 days
Egg Description
Dull white, usually without markings.
Condition at Hatching
Covered with light-gray down; eyes brown; gape, legs, and skin pink
www.allaboutbirds.org.
Photo by Tony Northrup http://www.northrup.org/ used with permission
Photo by Tony Northrup http://www.northrup.org/ used with permission

Bald Eagles typically nest in forested areas adjacent to large bodies of water, staying away from heavily developed areas when possible.
Bald Eagles build some of the largest of all bird nests—typically 5 to 6 feet in diameter and 2 to 4 feet tall and ranging in shape from cylindrical to conical to flat, depending on the supporting tree. Both sexes bring materials to the nest, but the female does most of the placement.
www.allaboutbirds.org
Photo by Tony Northrup http://www.northrup.org/ used with permission
Photo by Tony Northrup http://www.northrup.org/ used with permission

Photo by Tony Northrup http://www.northrup.org/ used with permission
Photo by Tony Northrup http://www.northrup.org/ used with permission

Pesticides like DDT also wreaked havoc on eagles
and other birds. These chemicals collect in fish,
which make up most of the eagle's diet. They
weaken the bird's eggshells and severely limited
their ability to reproduce. Since DDT use was
heavily restricted in 1972, eagle numbers
have rebounded significantly and have been
aided by reintroduction programs.
animals.nationalgeographic.com

National Geographic article




National Geographic Kids - with video and eagle calls

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Arkive of Life